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Ann Puddicombe, a Bumble Bee Watch Star

Ann Puddicombe is among the top ten Bumble Bee Watch submitters in North America and top three in Ontario. She has contributed close to 500 records, including 13 species from 242 verified records. But that’s not all. A self-described bumble bee advocate, Ann has voluntarily given presentations on bumble bees to community groups, conducted her own independent bumble bee surveys, and advised local groups in creating pollinator habitat.

Still Questing for Bee Nests

Did you beat the odds this year and spot a bumble bee nest? If so, we really want to hear from you for York University’s #Quest4BeeNests research project!

5 Ways Wildlife Preservation Canada’s Bumble Bee Recovery & Conservation Initiatives Benefit from Bumble Bee Watch

Wildlife Preservation Canada’s efforts to conserve native bumble bees would be nothing without help from our volunteer community scientists across the country, and without Bumble Bee Watch.

Community Scientists Take on the Cultivar Conundrum

The Xerces Society’s blog post “Picking Plants for Pollinators: The Cultivar Conundrum” highlighted the lack of research on this topic. To help address this knowledge gap, Budburst launched the Nativars research project in 2018.

A Quest for Bumble Bee Nests: The Missing Link

Researchers at York University are recruiting members from across North America for a very important mission. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it: find and submit sightings of bumble bee nests.

Kicking Off Canadian Bumble Bee Watch Training Events!

During this year's Pollinator Week (June 18 to 24) multiple locations in Ontario and Alberta were buzzing with activity, including an assortment of Bumble Bee Watch community-science training events led by Wildlife Preservation Canada.

Surprising Results from a Survey of Bumble Bee Watch Users

This past February, Bumble Bee Watch users were invited to take a survey run by York University researchers to learn more about participant demographics, motives, and confidence with bumble bee identification.

Wildlife Preservation Canada Continues Training “Bumble Bee Watchers”

Begun in 2015 at one location in Ontario, Wildlife Preservation Canada has expanded Bumbe Bee Watch citizen science training programs to multiple locations across Canada. The programs are held in areas with historical observations of at-risk species.

Observations by Community Scientists Expand Known Range of the Two-Spotted Bumble Bee

Contributions to the community science program Bumble Bee Watch are expanding our understanding of where species have been - and potentially where they are going.