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Endangered Species Conservation

A monarch nectars on pink and white milkweed blossoms in this very detailed close-up image.
(Photo: Xerces Society / Stephanie McKnight)

Invertebrates form the foundation of many our terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and yet they are greatly underappreciated in mainstream conservation. Destruction of habitat, pesticides, disease, and climate change are all factors leading to the decline of invertebrate species. To conserve and restore the diversity of life on earth, the Xerces Society’s endangered species conservation program engages in education, research, community science (sometimes referred to as "citizen science," or "participatory science"), conservation planning, and advocacy to protect at-risk species and their habitats. We collaborate with scientists and land managers to raise awareness about the plight of invertebrates and to gain protection for the most vulnerable species before they decline to a level at which recovery is impossible.

 

Our Work

Learn more about the key species that we're working to protect and recover:

 

Learn More

Community Science

Everyone is welcome to join these collaborative data-gathering efforts—no technical expertise necessary!

At-Risk Invertebrates

Learn more about the conservation statuses of the animals we seek to protect.

Identification and Field Guides

View guides for identification and further study in the field.

What We're Doing

We're conducting field research, developing habitat management guidance, advocating for protection for key species, and more.

Endangered Species Conservation on the Blog

The latest news from the Xerces Society's endangered species conservation team—including updates from the field, policy work, opportunities to participate in community science, and more!

Together, these publications contribute to our growing understanding of how human actions can hurt—or help—monarchs.

Joan Mosenthal DeWind was an early member of the Xerces Society and a keen supporter of getting young people involved in invertebrate conservation. In her memory, her husband Bill DeWind established a student research endowment fund, which is administered by the Xerces Society.

Protecting, restoring, and enhancing firefly habitat is one of the best ways to conserve their populations. In addition, collecting data on firefly populations and distributions will contribute to a better understanding of their conservation status and needs. This is why we have initiated the Xerces Society’s firefly conservation campaign: Conserving the Jewels of the Night.

October's featured staff members recently attended a carbon farm planning training in California, and spoke at an event that paired art and conservation in Iowa.