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Pollinator Conservation Resources for California

Welcome to our Pollinator Conservation Resource Center! The Xerces Society produces dozens of publications each year to inform and guide conservation efforts and to share the latest science-based conservation information. You can browse the list below or filter results by publication type, keyword, or a combination of the two. When filtering by keyword, we suggest leaving the publication type as "any" to show the widest number of results.

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The goal of this tool is to evaluate pollinator habitat at a given urban, suburban, or rural site and identify areas for improvement. This process will also help users prioritize the most essential next steps to take for pollinators at the site.
Improving pollinator habitat along roadsides and rights-of-way has many benefits, even beyond providing habitat for these important insects—including carbon sequestration and soil stabilization. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
Given the many ways that climate change is likely to impact pollinators and plant-pollinator interactions, we propose multiple strategies to increase climate resilience for pollinators in natural areas. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
You can take several actions to alleviate the effects of climate change on pollinators. This fact sheet provides an overview of strategies to reduce the impacts of drought, increased temperatures, and frequent heat waves in agricultural lands. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
Pollinators are essential to the health of our environment and for bountiful farm crops. There are four straightforward steps that you can take to help them: grow flowers, provide nest sites, avoid pesticides, and share the word.
for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects
The plants on this list are recommended for use in pollinator habitat restoration and enhancement projects in agricultural landscapes on the California Sierra Foothills Region.
Minimizing Risks to Pollinators and Beneficial Insects
Even pesticides allowed for use in organic agriculture can cause harm to bees and other beneficial insects. This guide provides a brief overview of how to select and apply pesticides for organic farm operations while minimizing pollinator mortality.
A Comparative Overview
This fact sheet is intended to be a quick reference to help you select and use organically-approved pesticides with the least impact on bees and other beneficial insects.
Pollinators and Climate Change
In California, climate change is expected to cause higher temperatures, more frequent and longer heat waves, and increased drought frequency and severity. Extreme weather events will also become more common. These challenges posed by climate change are extensive, but there ways you can increase climate resilience for pollinators in your yard, neighborhood park, or whole community.
The western monarch population is now less than 1% of its size in the 1980s, and urgent action is needed to stabilize their numbers. Here's how farmers can help.
To help land managers incorporate pollinator-friendly practices into rangeland management, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation developed Best Management Practices for Pollinators on Western Rangelands. These guidelines were developed for federally managed rangelands that span the eleven western United States: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
Most of North America’s native bee species only forage over a distance of a few hundred yards, so with a little planning, your yard can provide a safe space for bees and other pollinators to thrive.
This fact sheet delves into how these impacts on pollinators occur, and offers mitigation measures and alternative pest management strategies.
"On behalf of our millions of members and supporters, the undersigned organizations and companies are writing to urge you to protect pollinators in the next Farm Bill."
Restoring monarch habitat, including roadsides, is important to the species’ recovery. A diversity of milkweed species is found on roadsides, on which readily monarchs lay their eggs, but roadsides provide more than just milkweed. They can also provide diverse nectar sources to feed adult monarchs and other pollinators. This guide highlights best management practices to reduce the impacts of herbicides on monarchs.
A diversity of milkweed species is found on roadsides, and play an important role in supporting the life cycle of monarchs. This guide can help you recognize the most common native species of milkweed on roadsides in your region.
To better inform consumers about the plants and seeds they buy, a state could require labeling of plants and plant materials that have been treated with a neonicotinoid. Retail establishments can also institute such labeling voluntarily, and some already have.

Imagine that the city of Los Angeles had shrunk to the size of the town of Monterey. You’d be shocked. Basically, that is what has happened to the monarch butterflies that overwinter in California. At Thanksgiving 2018, the population of western monarchs hit a record low of less than 29,000 butterflies, a decline of 99.4% since the 1980s, when the number of monarchs flying to California for the winter is estimated to have been 4.5 million. For every 160 monarchs there were 30 years ago, there is only one left flying today.

Western monarchs need everyone’s help. In 2018, the population hit a new low, less than 29,000 butterflies—a loss of more than 99% since the 1980s. This Western Monarch Call to Action aims to provide a set of rapid-response conservation actions that, if applied immediately, can help the western monarch population bounce back from its extremely low 2018–19 overwintering size. Long-term conservation effort is needed to rebuild the western population of monarchs. The goal of this call to action is to identify actions that can be implemented in the short-term, to avoid a total collapse of the western monarch migration and set the stage for longer-term efforts to have time to start making a difference.
Seeking protection for the Crotch bumble bee (Bombus crotchii), Franklin's bumble bee (Bombus franklini), Suckley cuckoo bumble bee (Bombus suckleyi), and western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis).
Seeking protection for the Crotch bumble bee (Bombus crotchii), Franklin's bumble bee (Bombus franklini), Suckley cuckoo bumble bee (Bombus suckleyi), and western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis).