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Pollinator Conservation Resources - General

Resources to aid in the planning, establishment, restoration, and maintenance of pollinator habitat.

The Xerces Society produces dozens of publications each year to share the latest science-based conservation information; guide conservation efforts; and support farmers, gardeners, and other invertebrate enthusiasts in creating healthy habitat for the "little things that run the world."

The pollinator resources found on this page support habitat restoration throughout the mainland United States and Canada.

For a directory of regional resources, please click here or refer to the state- and province-specific links on this page. For questions, comments, or to suggest additional content, please email [email protected].

 

Improving pollinator habitat along roadsides and rights-of-way has many benefits, even beyond providing habitat for these important insects—including carbon sequestration and soil stabilization. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
Given the many ways that climate change is likely to impact pollinators and plant-pollinator interactions, we propose multiple strategies to increase climate resilience for pollinators in natural areas. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
You can take several actions to alleviate the effects of climate change on pollinators. This fact sheet provides an overview of strategies to reduce the impacts of drought, increased temperatures, and frequent heat waves in agricultural lands. Although this fact sheet is centered on California, many lessons are more broadly applicable, and can provide a useful jumping-off point for climate-smart habitat planning for other regions.
Western monarchs need everyone’s help. In 2018, the population hit a new low, less than 29,000 butterflies—a loss of more than 99% since the 1980s. This Western Monarch Call to Action aims to provide a set of rapid-response conservation actions that, if applied immediately, can help the western monarch population bounce back from its extremely low 2018–19 overwintering size. Long-term conservation effort is needed to rebuild the western population of monarchs. The goal of this call to action is to identify actions that can be implemented in the short-term, to avoid a total collapse of the western monarch migration and set the stage for longer-term efforts to have time to start making a difference.
Monarch Butterfly Nectar Plant Lists for Conservation Plantings is a helpful tool for ecological restoration, providing lists of plants known to support monarch adults and caterpillars.
Plant Ecology, Seed Production Methods, and Habitat Restoration Opportunities
Milkweeds: A Conservation Practitioner’s Guide provides conservation professionals with information about optimizing milkweed seed production methods, offers guidance on incorporating milkweeds into restoration and revegetation efforts, and highlights milkweeds’ unique characteristics and value to wildlife. Native seed producers, restoration practitioners, land managers, monarch conservationists, gardeners, and landowners will all find this guide valuable.
Second Edition
This 18-page, full-color guide helps readers identify wild pollinators, provide them with food and habitat, and avoid pesticides that are toxic to them. By encouraging wild bee abundance and diversity, agricultural growers may be able to buffer rising honey bee rental costs while creating an environment that better supports both wild and commercial bees.
How you can attract and protect beautiful, beneficial insects
Protect and nurture the best-loved of garden guests: butterflies, nature’s kaleidoscopes with wings. The Xerces Society introduces you to a variety of butterflies who need our help, and provides suggestions for native plants to attract them, habitat designs to help them thrive, and garden practices to accommodate all their stages of life.
Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
Attracting Native Pollinators is Illustrated with hundreds of color photographs and dozens of specially created illustrations across four sections: pollinators and pollination, taking action, bees of North America, and creating a pollinator-friendly landscape. Read it for your own enjoyment or use it as a teaching guide to inform others.