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Agriculture & Working Lands

Eleven articles published in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers the most comprehensive look to date at the topic of insect decline and the ramifications of losing diversity, abundance and biomass of insects. Scott Black, Executive Director of the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, is a coauthor on "Eight Simple Actions that Individuals can Take to Save Insects from Global Declines."
A group of health and environmental organizations filed a legal petition today, calling upon the California Department of Pesticide Regulation to regulate the planting of crop seeds coated with neurotoxic neonicotinoid insecticides (neonics) and close a loophole that allows the unchecked use of neonic-treated seeds in California’s farms. The petition follows a scientific report released today finding these seeds may result in the use of over half a million pounds of unregulated pesticides per year in the state. 
As the Environmental Protection Agency prepares to determine whether to renew dicamba product registrations for the 2021 growing season, a new report details how the herbicides pose serious threats to wild plants and the wildlife that depend upon them. The report from the National Wildlife Federation, Prairie Rivers Network and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Drifting Toward Disaster: How Dicamba Herbicides are Harming Cultivated and Wild Landscapes, reviews the state of the science on the potential far-reaching impacts of dicamba use.
June 20, 2017—A new certification program enables farmers to show consumers they are farming in ways that benefit bees. The Bee Better CertifiedTM program is launched by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, in partnership with Oregon Tilth. The development of Bee Better Certified was funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.