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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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This brochure introduces the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and explains what we do and why. 

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee City USA brings communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee City USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your community can join Bee City USA.

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee Campus USA brings college communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee Campus USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your college can join Bee Campus USA.

Visitor Etiquette for Sustainable Firefly Tourism
This easy-print Visitor’s Etiquette Guide can be displayed or distributed by site managers and volunteers before events to promote sustainable firefly tourism. Three copies can be printed on a single sheet of letter paper using a small office printer, making it easy to share with participants before and during events. Also available in Spanish, French, and Simplified Chinese.

An instructional insert explaining how to hang a Xerces Society yard sign from the gift center using screws, zip ties, or nails. 

The Florida intertidal firefly (micronaspis floridana) was proposed for listing in 2023 through a petition submitted by the Xerces Society.

The the loopy five firefly (Photuris forresti) was proposed for listing in 2023 through a petition submitted by the Xerces Society.

The the mysterious lantern firefly (Photuris mysticalampas) was proposed for listing in 2023 through a petition submitted by the Xerces Society. The mysterious lantern firefly, a native species endemic to the Delmarva Peninsula of Delaware and Maryland, is associated with high quality forested peatland floodplain habitats. It is known from only six sites in two watershed. As a habitat specialist, the mysterious lantern firefly is threatened by habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation.

under the Endangered Species Act and to Concurrently Designate Critical Habitat
The Xerces Society and our conservation partners at the Center for Biological Diversity have submitted a joint petition for the emergency listing of the Bethany Beach firefly (Photuris bethaniensis)—with a request for the concurrent designation of critical habitat—under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The Southwest spring firefly (Bicellonycha wickershamorum) was proposed for listing as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act by the Xerces Society in 2023.

The Florida intertidal firefly, also known by the common names mangrove firefly and fiddler crab firefly, is a habitat specialist found only in the mangroves and salt marshes of coastal Florida and the Bahamas. Belonging to a tropical branch of the firefly family tree, this species is the only member of its genus in the United States.