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publications

Nature Close to Home: Reimagining Gardens to Support Invertebrates

Scott Hoffman Black, executive director of the Xerces Society, encourages gardeners to increase the diversity of native plants, ensure that there are places for insects to nest, and avoid using pesticides.

New Xerces Fact Sheet Takes a Deeper Look at Fungicides and Their Effects on Pollinators

Introducing Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides: Fungicide Impacts on Pollinators.

Community Science Powers New Western Monarch Studies

Western monarch researchers and community scientists have been busy, contributing information vital to understanding the situation facing this imperiled population.

Managing Invertebrate-Friendly Gardens

Many Xerces Society members create wildlife gardens that are particularly hospitable to invertebrates. Here are three wonderful examples.

Bee City USA: Galvanizing Communities to Reverse Pollinator Decline

Collectively, urban and suburban areas have the potential of offering millions of acres of life-giving habitat to pollinators.

Mitigating the Effects of Heat on Urban Pollinators

Climate change will bring higher temperatures and greater extremes in weather, as well as increases in the frequency and intensity of heat waves. These variations will be exacerbated in cities in ways that may spell trouble for bees.

Are Freshwater Mussels in Hot Water?

Freshwater mussels play an important role in maintaining water quality in creeks. Climate change is altering water conditions, impacting the mussels and the fish on which they rely for part of their life cycle.

A Shifting Climate Creates Winners and Losers

We are already observing impacts on some species that are emerging earlier or whose distributions are changing, but it is difficult to characterize how insects as a whole will be impacted: some species will benefit while most will lose out.

The Striking Beauty of Oklahoma’s Butterflies

Oklahoma’s impressive butterfly fauna of more than 170 species includes the nation’s largest and the smallest, and representatives of all six major butterfly families.

Ups and Downs of English Chalk Grasslands

About a third of Britain’s sixty resident butterfly species may be encountered on chalk grasslands, but it is a handful of blues—common, chalkhill, small, and Adonis—that may be most characteristic of this habitat.

Keeping the Lights Burning: The Status of Fireflies in the United States and Canada

Fireflies are well loved, but they may be in trouble. Xerces will continue to seek a better understanding of these enchanting animals and how best to protect them.

Can Robobees Solve the Pollination Crisis?

Focusing solely on crop pollination and failing to take the pollination of native plants into account may well lead to a deterioration in the plant communities that make up the very fabric of our environment.

Lincoln Brower: A Life Well Spent

Remembering a ground-breaking monarch researcher, a passionate advocate for monarchs, and a beloved member of the conservation community.

Managing for Monarchs in the West

A new guide to protecting the monarch butterfly from the Pacific to the Rockies presents a holistic approach to monarch conservation.

Unblinded by Science

As the anniversary of the March for Science approaches, we reflect on ways science has informed our conservation efforts over the past year.

Newly Released Monarch Overwintering Site Management Plan Provides Blueprint for Protecting and Managing Monarch Groves

This western monarch butterfly overwintering site management plan also serves as a template for land managers at other overwintering sites.