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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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Use the search functions to sort by publication type (books, guidelines, fact sheets, etc.), location, and/or subject (agriculture, gardens, pollinators, pesticides, etc.).

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Plant Ecology, Seed Production Methods, and Habitat Restoration Opportunities
Milkweeds: A Conservation Practitioner’s Guide provides conservation professionals with information about optimizing milkweed seed production methods, offers guidance on incorporating milkweeds into restoration and revegetation efforts, and highlights milkweeds’ unique characteristics and value to wildlife. Native seed producers, restoration practitioners, land managers, monarch conservationists, gardeners, and landowners will all find this guide valuable.

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) worked with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to develop this report, which synthesizes the scientific literature and existing best management practices for monarch butterflies along with input from a survey of monarch experts and a survey of EPRI members. Monarch experts were surveyed to identify the relative benefit of specific conservation actions for monarchs as well as to provide opinions on the opportunities for power companies to engage in monarch conservation.

It can be difficult to establish native milkweeds in the western states. The Xerces Society partnered with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Plant Materials Centers to find the best methods for planting and growing two widespread species, showy milkweed and narrow-leaved milkweed. This fact sheet presents the information learned from these trials.

Essays on Invertebrate Conservation
The Xerces Society marks its fiftieth birthday this December. This is a time to reflect on what has been achieved and the people who contributed to our success, but it is also important to look ahead at how we can continue this vital work. The articles in this issue of Wings describe initiatives that move us in new directions.

Information about the contents of and how to plant the California monarch and pollinator habitat kits

A Guide to Saving America’s Butterfly
This brochure contains information about how to enhance any landscape to help meet the seasonal needs of monarchs.
Habitat Installation Guide
These region-and state-specific guidelines provide in-depth practical guidance on how to install and maintain nectar- and pollen-rich habitat for pollinators in the form of wildflower meadow plantings/conservation cover (NRCS Conservation Practice 327) or linear rows of native flowering shrubs/hedgerow plantings (NRCS Conservation Practice 422). Seed mixes and plant recommendations for each region are included in the appendix of each guide. 
Habitat Installation Guide
These region-and state-specific guidelines provide in-depth practical guidance on how to install and maintain nectar- and pollen-rich habitat for pollinators in the form of wildflower meadow plantings/conservation cover (NRCS Conservation Practice 327) or linear rows of native flowering shrubs/hedgerow plantings (NRCS Conservation Practice 422). Seed mixes and plant recommendations for each region are included in the appendix of each guide. 
A diversity of milkweed species is found on roadsides, and play an important role in supporting the life cycle of monarchs. This guide can help you recognize the most common native species of milkweed on roadsides in your region.
Western monarchs need everyone’s help. Starting in 2018, monarch butterflies had tough seasons in their migratory and breeding grounds in the western states and, in the following two winters, the annual Xerces Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count showed that the population hit a new low: In both 2018 and 2019, volunteers counted under 30,000 monarchs—less than 1% of the population’s historic size. This Western Monarch Call to Action, led by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, aims to provide a set of rapid-response conservation actions that, if applied immediately, can help the western monarch population bounce back from its critically low overwintering size.