native bees


Bugfest – Raleigh, NC

Published on May 22, 2019

September 21st, 2019
9:00 AM – 7:00 PM
NC Museum of Natural Sciences
Raleigh, NC

Join Phyllis Stiles, Bee city USA Founder and Pollinator Champion with the Xerces Society, and Nancy Adamson, Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Xerces Society, along with about 30,000 bug-loving friends for a Raleigh tradition! Phyllis and Nancy will host a kid-friendly table about pollinators. North Carolina’s Museum of Natural Sciences hosts over 100 exhibits, crafts, games and activities. Meet entomologists and other scientists and learn about the fascinating world of bugs. You can visit Café Insecta to sample buggy dishes prepared by local chefs. Free and everyone is welcome!

Click here for more information.


Rome Floyd Beekeepers Meeting – Rome, GA

Published on May 14, 2019

June 6th, 2019
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Rome-Floyd ECO Center
Rome, GA

Join Phyllis Stiles, Bee City USA Founder and Pollinator Champion of the Xerces Society, as she speaks to the importance of all pollinators and what beekeepers can do to help reverse their decline.

Click here for more information.


Planting for Pollinators: Conserving Native Pollinators in Towns and Cities – Athens, GA

Published on May 3, 2019

June 21st, 2019
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
State Botanical Garden of Georgia
Athens, GA

Join Xerces staff and partners for this workshop that will open a window into the fascinating world of North America’s native bees and butterflies, introduce you to what they need, and examine the threats that make the future daunting for them. You will learn about native bee and other insect natural history, their importance to our environment and food supply, and most importantly, the straightforward steps you can take to create lasting change in our urban landscapes to better support bees and other wildlife in your community.

Click here for more information and to register.


Planting for Pollinators: Conserving Native Pollinators in Towns and Cities – Atlanta, GA

Published on

June 22nd, 2019
9:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum
Atlanta, GA

Join Xerces staff and partners for this workshop that will open a window into the fascinating world of North America’s native bees and butterflies, introduce you to what they need, and examine the threats that make the future daunting for them. You will learn about native bee and other insect natural history, their importance to our environment and food supply, and most importantly, the straightforward steps you can take to create lasting change in our urban landscapes to better support bees and other wildlife in your community.

Click here for more information and to register.


Rusty patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis)

Five Ways Wildlife Preservation Canada’s Bumble Bee Recovery & Conservation Initiatives are Benefitting from the Success of Bumble Bee Watch

Published on May 2, 2019

We at Wildlife Preservation Canada want to thank each and every one of the community scientists that contribute valuable data to Bumble Bee Watch, and the expert verifiers across North America who have spent countless hours identifying submissions. Wildlife Preservation Canada’s efforts to conserve native bumble bees would be nothing without help from our volunteer Read more …


Flowering clover in almond orchard

Pollinator Conservation Program Digest – April 2019

Published on April 30, 2019

April’s featured staff are all Farm Bill Pollinator Conservation Planners, and are spread across the country—driving the adoption of cover cropping in California, guiding blueberry farmers to become more pollinator-friendly in Maine, and raising awareness of the importance of rangeland for pollinator conservation in North Dakota.


Long-horned bee

Bee City USA Mobilizes Communities to Support Imperiled Pollinators—Here’s How to Join

Published on April 26, 2019

Earth Week is an inspiring time, brimming with opportunities to make a difference in the days following Earth Day—and beyond. If you want to mobilize your city or county to make room for pollinators, then the Xerces Society’s initiative, Bee City USA, may have the formula you need. Bee City USA founder Phyllis Stiles explains how to get your community certified.


Honoring Robbin Thorp, a Living Legend of North American Bee Conservation

Published on April 24, 2019

Robbin Thorp, Professor Emeritus at University of California–Davis, has made lasting contributions to the bee conservation community in ways that might never be measured, but will certainly be felt. As such, it is fitting to recognize this living legend of North American bumble bee conservation during Earth Week.


Garden Gloves & Weeds

Pesticide-Free Gardening Tips for Earth Week and Beyond

Published on April 23, 2019

In a home garden, the Xerces Society urges people to consider non-chemical pest management. To meet this challenge, please consider spending Earth Week in the garden, enjoying the diversity of insects, and taking a few of the actions outlined below to simultaneously minimize pest problems and avoid the use of pesticides.


Bee Better Certified pollinator habitat at Erdman Family Farms

Bee Better Certified Engages the Almond Industry

Published on April 22, 2019

With a robust set of requirements on pesticide use and the highest standards for protecting and restoring pollinator habitat of any food certification, Bee Better Certified represents a new era in biodiversity protection on farms—and what better time to celebrate this program’s growth than during Earth Week?


Earth Week - Xerces Society

Pledge to Bring Back the Pollinators—on Earth Day and Every Day

Published on

During Earth Week 2019, we are asking you to consider taking simple, yet impactful, steps to make the world better for bees, butterflies, and other essential invertebrates.


Connecting the Dots for Pollinator Conservation: Wildflower Meadows and Pollinator Habitat – Durham, NH

Published on April 19, 2019

July 30th, 2019
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Woodman Research Farm
Durham, NH

Join Mace Vaughan, Pollinator Program Co-Director with the Xerces Society, for this field day at Woodman Research Farm. The event will include a presentation by Mace, a research field tour, and updates on the NH Pollinator Plan, the 2019 Bee Bill, cost share programs and other efforts to conserve and protect pollinators at the local, state, and national levels. Mace will discuss the growing number of efforts by which citizens, farmers, gardeners, researchers, and others are banding together to turn around the decline in pollinators. There is no charge for attending this event.

Click here for more information and to register.


Citizen Scientists Take on the Cultivar Conundrum

Published on April 10, 2019

The Xerces Society’s blog post “Picking Plants for Pollinators: The Cultivar Conundrum” highlighted the lack of research on this topic, which limits our ability to make informed choices regarding the use of cultivars for supporting pollinators and other beneficial insects. To help address this knowledge gap, Budburst launched the Nativars research project in 2018.


Yellow-banded bumble bee (Bombus terricola)

A Quest for Bumble Bee Nests: The Missing Link

Published on March 26, 2019

Researchers at York University are recruiting members from across North America for a very important mission. You will need to be vigilant, always observing. This subject is elusive. Determination, a sharp eye, and a smartphone will be your greatest assets. The mission, should you choose to accept it: find and submit sightings of bumble bee nests.


North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University Hedgerow

Pollinator Conservation Program Digest – February 2019

Published on February 25, 2019

February’s featured staff member has been working on a hedgerow featuring diverse native species in North Carolina.


Quino checkerspot butterfly

National Butterfly Center Gets Reprieve—But Border Wall Will Impact Much More

Published on February 15, 2019

There are many reasons to oppose the wall along the southern border—including the loss of habitat for some of our smallest and most important animals.


Cedaroak Trillium Garden

Cedaroak Park Primary School Gardens Offer Learning Opportunities

Published on February 11, 2019

Being assigned to create an interpretive panel for Cedaroak Park Primary School, where I attended grade school, was a special experience.


Where Do Pollinators Go in the Winter?

Published on December 10, 2018

As the leaves and temperatures drop, it might be tempting to forget about your pollinator garden until spring. But don’t call it quits just yet! While it may seem like the bees have vanished for the year, they haven’t actually gone anywhere.


Aster

Fall Garden Tips to Benefit Bumble Bees All Year

Published on October 30, 2018

The growing season may be winding down, but fall is an important time to create habitat for bumble bees and other native pollinators. The work you do now will help support overwintering pollinators and support the next generation of bumble bees.


Apples

Celebrate Invertebrates During National Apple Month

Published on October 10, 2018

We owe our beautiful autumn apple harvest to invertebrates—pollinators and beneficial insects alike. No matter how you obtain your apples—whether you pick them yourself, grab them at the grocery store, or go bobbing for them—it is important to take a moment to remember the invertebrates that make this delicious harvest possible.


Hawai‘ian Yellow-Faced Bees: The First U.S. Bees Proposed for ESA Protection

Published on September 30, 2015

This summer, I had the pleasure of visiting Hawai‘i with my family. What a wonderful vacation! Beautiful beaches, kayaking, sea turtles, fresh pineapple, fabulous tropical gardens, volcanoes—but I also went in hunt of bees. I found bees in the gardens of the first place we stayed. But the carpenter bees and honey bees were not Read more …


Delectable Native Plants Attract a Very Special Crowd

Published on May 20, 2015

What do cherries, plums, serviceberries, black raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, and crab apples have in common (apart from making your mouth water)? What about blueberries, cranberries, teaberries, and kinnikinnick? All are fruits of North American plants pollinated by native bees, flies, and other insects. Cherries and company are all in the rose family, while blueberries and Read more …