Recent Xerces Society News

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes Endangered Species Act protection for Franklin’s bumble bee

Monday, August 12th, 2019

Responding to a petition from the Xerces Society and the late Dr. Robbin Thorp, Professor Emeritus at University of California–Davis, tomorrow the United States Fish and Wildlife Service will propose to list Franklin’s bumble bee (Bombus franklini) as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), making it the first bee in the western U.S. to be officially recognized under the ESA.

 

Arriving in Stores: Bee Better Certified Blueberries

Thursday, July 11th, 2019

In partnership with AC Foods and Oregon Tilth, we’re pleased to announce the arrival of California Giant brand Bee Better Certified organic blueberries. Sourced from farms near Independence, Oregon and arriving soon at a variety of grocery stores, these berries represent tremendous dedication and conservation ethic by the farms that produced them.

 

Declines in Insect Abundance and Diversity: We Know Enough to Act Now—New Paper Details Why We Need to Act to Protect Insects

Monday, June 24th, 2019

In addition to the data supporting the decline of insect populations, patterns are emerging that point to the primary drivers of insect declines. The most influential factors are habitat loss and degradation, pesticides and climate change although other factors include disease, invasive species and light pollution. The paper not only presents the problem, but also provides examples of success stories in insect conservation, from both terrestrial and aquatic environments spanning three continents. The authors also propose actions that can be taken to address insect declines, which can be implemented by various societal sectors including nations, states, provinces and cities, working lands, natural areas, and homes and gardens.

 

Emergency Endangered Species Act Protection Sought for Delaware Firefly

Wednesday, May 15th, 2019

The Center for Biological Diversity and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation filed an emergency petition today seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the critically imperiled Bethany Beach firefly.

 

Announcing the 2019 DeWind Awardees

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

The Xerces Society is happy to announce the 2019 Dewind awardees: Niranjana Krishnan, a PhD candidate at Iowa State University, and Molly Wiebush, a master’s student at Florida State University.

 

National Butterfly Center Gets Reprieve—But Border Wall Will Impact Much More

Friday, February 15th, 2019

There are many reasons to oppose the wall along the southern border—including the loss of habitat for some of our smallest and most important animals.

 

Monarch Butterflies in Western North America in Jeopardy

Thursday, January 17th, 2019

Population of monarchs overwintering in California at lowest level ever recorded Media Contacts: Emma Pelton, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist; emma.pelton@xerces.org, (971) 533-7245 Sarina Jepsen, Endangered Species Program Director; sarina.jepsen@xerces.org, (971) 244-3727 PORTLAND, Ore.; Thursday, 1/17/19—The population of monarch butterflies overwintering in California has fallen to the lowest level ever recorded. Surveys done by volunteers with Read more …

 

Record Low Number of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies in California—They Need Your Help!

Thursday, January 17th, 2019

We urge you to join us and our colleagues in the western monarch science and conservation community in taking meaningful, swift action to help save western monarchs.

 

Pollinators and the 2018 Farm Bill 

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Although we did not get everything we wanted in the 2018 Farm Bill, the very good news is that pollinators are still a priority for the USDA and the Natural Resource Conservation Service—and formal commitments to support conservation efforts are now in effect for at least the next five years.

 

Early Thanksgiving Counts Show a Critically Low Monarch Population in California

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

The California overwintering population has been reduced to less than 0.5% of its historical size, and has declined by 86% compared to 2017. While western monarchs are facing unprecedented challenges right now, there is still hope that we can recover the population if we work quickly, strategically, and together.

 

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