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Xerces Events

To request staff participation at an event or to be a speaker, please fill out our speaker request form here. For questions regarding the speaker request form contact Rachel Dunham at [email protected].

 

The list of events on this page will be updated regularly. To view past webinars, please visit our YouTube channel. We also announce events on social media and via our e-newsletter. If you have questions, please email [email protected].

May 19
9:30 AM - 5:00 PM PT
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90007
Los Angeles, CA

Join the Xerces Society at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's annual two day festival celebrating our winged and multi-legged friends! Endangered species conservation biologists and Xerces ambassadors will be sharing information about how you can conserve insects through the Pollinator Kit Program, Bumble Bee Atlas, Western Monarch Count, and more! We will have educational activities for all ages, so please visit our table at this family-friendly event!

Learn more and register today!


Giovanni Di Franco - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Pollinator Habitat Specialist - Xerces Society
Giovanni Di Franco joined the Xerces Society in 2024. He is proudly participating in the development of the habitat kit program in southern California to increase pollinator habitats in urban areas in the greater Los Angeles area. He comes with a bachelor's degree in environmental science from Loyola Marymount University and a master's degree from UC Irvine focusing on habitat conservation and restoration practices in coastal sage scrub habitats. Giovanni has spent many years working with digital media and hopes to create creative campaigns to engage locals and community partners in pollinator conservation practices. During his free time, Giovanni enjoys tending to his home native garden and spending time with his tuxedo cat, Charlie.


Sara Cuadra - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Monarch Overwintering Specialist - Xerces Society
Sara Cuadra (she/her) is a conservation biologist based in Southern California who provides guidance to local land managers and stakeholders to preserve and restore monarch overwintering sites. She also supports Xerces staff and the community in the annual Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count. Sara found her grounding in ecology at Cal State Long Beach, where she earned her undergraduate degree in organismal biology. She also holds a master’s degree from UC Irvine, where her capstone work examined the effect of functional traits in coastal scrub plants on biodiversity at multiple trophic levels. Before joining Xerces in 2023, she worked with several organizations in the Los Angeles-Orange County area to restore coastal habitats and engage with the community through environmental education. Outside of work, Sara enjoys record collecting, rock climbing, and going for nature walks.

May 19
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM PT
Mare Island Promenade: 860 Nimitz Avenue, Vallejo, CA 94592
Vallejo, CA

Get ready to flutter your wings and immerse yourself in the enchanting world of butterflies at the Bay Area Butterfly Festival 2024! This is a family-friendly community festival with fantastic bands and performers, food trucks offering a variety of cuisines, free kids games and activities, talented artisans selling sustainable wares, butterfly conservation workshops and more! The Xerces Society will give a talk about protecting monarch overwintering sites in the Bay Area from 3-4pm. Join us in the celebration!

Learn more and register today!


Isis Howard - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Western Monarch Community Science - Xerces Society
As an endangered species conservation biologist, Isis works in California to protect and support the western population of monarch butterflies. She manages several community science projects, including the annual Western Monarch Count and the Western Monarch Milkweed Mapper, and provides support to land managers and the public on maintaining and restoring western monarch breeding habitat. Prior to joining Xerces, Isis worked for a resource conservation district and the North Coast Soil Hub, advancing climate adaptation work in the agricultural sector, engaging diverse community partners, and expanding the RCDs' western monarch and pollinator program. Originally from Sonoma County, CA, Isis is an experienced outdoor educator and holds a bachelor's degree in environmental management and protection with a minor in biology from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. In her free time, Isis enjoys listening to podcasts, trying new creative outlets, and advocating for diversity and inclusion in the outdoors.

May 20
5:30 - 7:30 PM MT
Zoom
Montana, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Wyoming

This webinar will prepare community scientists and agency biologists to participate in the Montana and Mountain States (Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and Wyoming) Bumble Bee Atlas Project. During this webinar, we will cover how to sign up for the project, Atlas protocols, how to complete a survey, and how to submit data. We will also answer any questions you may have.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Learn more and register today!


Michelle Toshack - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Montana Bumble Bee Atlas - Xerces Society
Michelle leads the Montana Bumble Bee Atlas to engage community scientists in conserving bumble bees. Michelle obtained a masters in biological sciences from Simon Fraser University, where she researched pollinator biodiversity and the impacts of farming practices on bumble bees. She has led the strategy and implementation of numerous community science programs across North America to advance conservation efforts. Michelle enjoys exploring the natural beauty of the Rocky Mountains in many ways, especially ridge-top scrambling, mountain running, and wild ice skating.

May 23
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT/ 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Zoom

Join Xerces pollinator conservation biologist Emily May to learn more about the pollinators that come out to work as others turn in for the evening. Moths, flies, beetles, and other dusk and night-time pollinators can play important roles in pollinating wild and managed plants. Emily will talk about the ecology, diversity, and importance of these hidden pollinators, and how we can best support them in our gardens and communities.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Learn more and register today!
 


Emily May - Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Agricultural Lead - Xerces Society
Emily May is a Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Xerces Society's Pesticide Program. She received a master's of science in entomology from Michigan State University, and has studied pollinator habitat restoration, bee nesting habits, and the effects of pest management practices on wild bee communities. Her work with Xerces since 2015 has focused on supporting crop pollinators through habitat creation and protecting bees and other beneficial insects from pesticides.

Jun 1
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM MT
Gerald W. Marks Exploration Center, 1075 South Ave W, Missoula, MT 59801
Missoula, MT

The Montana Bumble Bee Atlas is a community science effort aimed at gathering the data needed to track and conserve bumble bees. Community scientists spread out across one of our project states to survey for bumble bees and report back with whatever they find! Surveys can be run on your own or with a group of people. Survey methods are also catch-and-release, so no bees are harmed. All you will need to participate in the surveys is an insect net, some vials or jars, a decent camera (including cell phone cameras), internet access for data submission, and a way to get to your survey sites. With your help, we can quickly cover large regions of the country, collect scientific-quality data, and contribute to bumble bee conservation. This project joins a growing nation-wide network of Bumble Bee Atlas projects managed by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and partner organizations. 

This workshop will cover everything you need to participate in the Montana Bumble Bee Atlas: how to Atlas protocols, how to complete a survey, and how to submit data. We will also cover bumble bee ecology and conservation. Anyone with an interest in bees and a desire to help them in a hands-on way is encouraged to attend—no prior experience needed!

Learn more and register today!


Michelle Toshack - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Montana Bumble Bee Atlas - Xerces Society
Michelle leads the Montana Bumble Bee Atlas to engage community scientists in conserving bumble bees. Michelle obtained a masters in biological sciences from Simon Fraser University, where she researched pollinator biodiversity and the impacts of farming practices on bumble bees. She has led the strategy and implementation of numerous community science programs across North America to advance conservation efforts. Michelle enjoys exploring the natural beauty of the Rocky Mountains in many ways, especially ridge-top scrambling, mountain running, and wild ice skating.

Jun 1
10:00 AM - 12:30 PM ET
Francis Marion National Forest Huger, SC 29450
Huger, SC

Please join us in a collaborative effort to track and conserve the bumble bees of the Southeast through this training.

Want to connect with other Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas volunteers and get some hands-on experience? Join us for a field day! We'll go over how to use your insect net, how to collect data according to project methods, and how to identify bumble bees. Anyone with an interest in bees and a desire to help them in a hands-on way is encouraged to attend—no prior experience needed!

Learn more and register today!


Laurie Hamon - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist - Xerces Society
Laurie is a conservation biologist for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and the lead project manager for the Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas. She earned her PhD at North Carolina State University, where she conducted her thesis on the pollination ecology of Venus flytraps. She has conducted survey work for multiple rare insect species and investigated insect communities in urban pollinator gardens. Laurie was also co-coordinator on a community science project to monitor butterflies at a biological reserve in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Jun 2
10:00 AM - 12:30 PM ET
Ceylon Wildlife Management Area Woodbine, GA 31569
Woodbine, GA

Please join us in a collaborative effort to track and conserve the bumble bees of the Southeast through this training.

Want to connect with other Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas volunteers and get some hands-on experience? Join us for a field day! We'll go over how to use your insect net, how to collect data according to project methods, and how to identify bumble bees. Anyone with an interest in bees and a desire to help them in a hands-on way is encouraged to attend—no prior experience needed!

Learn more and register today!


Laurie Hamon - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist - Xerces Society
Laurie is a conservation biologist for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and the lead project manager for the Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas. She earned her PhD at North Carolina State University, where she conducted her thesis on the pollination ecology of Venus flytraps. She has conducted survey work for multiple rare insect species and investigated insect communities in urban pollinator gardens. Laurie was also co-coordinator on a community science project to monitor butterflies at a biological reserve in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Jun 8
9:30 AM - 12:00 PM ET
Green Swamp Preserve, 673 Green Swamp Rd NW, Supply, NC 28462
Supply, NC

Please join us in a collaborative effort to track and conserve the bumble bees of the Southeast through this training.

Want to connect with other Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas volunteers and get some hands-on experience? Join us for a field day! We'll go over how to use your insect net, how to collect data according to project methods, and how to identify bumble bees. Anyone with an interest in bees and a desire to help them in a hands-on way is encouraged to attend—no prior experience needed!

Learn more and register today!


Laurie Hamon - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist - Xerces Society
Laurie is a conservation biologist for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and the lead project manager for the Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas. She earned her PhD at North Carolina State University, where she conducted her thesis on the pollination ecology of Venus flytraps. She has conducted survey work for multiple rare insect species and investigated insect communities in urban pollinator gardens. Laurie was also co-coordinator on a community science project to monitor butterflies at a biological reserve in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Jun 15
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM MT
Montana State University, Plant Growth Center, Room 214, Bozeman, MT 59715
Bozeman, MT

The Montana Bumble Bee Atlas is a community science effort aimed at gathering the data needed to track and conserve bumble bees. Community scientists spread out across one of our project states to survey for bumble bees and report back with whatever they find! Surveys can be run on your own or with a group of people. Survey methods are also catch-and-release, so no bees are harmed. All you will need to participate in the surveys is an insect net, some vials or jars, a decent camera (including cell phone cameras), internet access for data submission, and a way to get to your survey sites. With your help, we can quickly cover large regions of the country, collect scientific-quality data, and contribute to bumble bee conservation. This project joins a growing nation-wide network of Bumble Bee Atlas projects managed by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and partner organizations.

This workshop will cover everything you need to participate in the Montana Bumble Bee Atlas: how to Atlas protocols, how to complete a survey, and how to submit data. We will also cover bumble bee ecology and conservation. Anyone with an interest in bees and a desire to help them in a hands-on way is encouraged to attend—no prior experience needed!

Learn more and register today!


Michelle Toshack - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Montana Bumble Bee Atlas - Xerces Society
Michelle leads the Montana Bumble Bee Atlas to engage community scientists in conserving bumble bees. Michelle obtained a masters in biological sciences from Simon Fraser University, where she researched pollinator biodiversity and the impacts of farming practices on bumble bees. She has led the strategy and implementation of numerous community science programs across North America to advance conservation efforts. Michelle enjoys exploring the natural beauty of the Rocky Mountains in many ways, especially ridge-top scrambling, mountain running, and wild ice skating.

Jun 27
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Zoom

Many of us know the butterfly life cycle– egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, adult. But how does this life cycle work in the hot Mojave or Sonoran deserts? What are butterflies in isolated springs across the West eating as caterpillars? How do they survive the winter in the Cascade Mountains? And how are these butterflies responding to habitat loss, pesticide exposure, and the changing climate we all find ourselves in?

The western United States contains hundreds of butterfly species, found in habitats ranging from hot, arid deserts to the peaks of the High Sierras. While some of these butterflies are widespread and can (luckily) be found in gardens, parks and natural areas across the West, others are much more localized. All of these species have amazing strategies to survive and thrive in what can be some of the most hostile climates in the United States. And many of them are facing threats new and old to their populations and habitats. Join Kevin Burls, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, as he starts with an overview of butterfly diversity in the West and then highlights some of the amazing strategies that have allowed them to colonize deserts, grasslands, and mountains. Kevin will also discuss the threats these butterflies face, and how we can all protect them and their habitats.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Learn more and register today!


Kevin Burls - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist - Xerces Society
As a conservation biologist for the endangered species program, Kevin’s efforts with the Xerces Society focus on protecting the hundreds of butterfly species that inhabit deserts, forests, and grasslands across the western United States. Many of these species are currently in decline or are threatened by habitat loss, insecticides, and the effects of climate change. Kevin’s work includes collaborating with land managers and scientists to understand the conservation needs of butterfly species, then advocating for their protection by crafting conservation guidelines and legislation with agencies and policy makers at the regional, state, and federal levels.

Before working with the Xerces Society, Kevin was the integrated pest management educator for the University of Nevada, Reno Extension program, with a focus on native pollinators and beneficial insects. In addition, Kevin and his wife co-founded the invertebrate science education nonprofit Nevada Bugs & Butterflies in Reno, Nevada in 2012. As a part of this work Kevin has spent several seasons searching for some of Nevada’s endemic and at-risk butterfly species in the mountains and deserts of the Great Basin. He holds a Ph.D. in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology from the University of Nevada, Reno. In his free time, you can find him hiking with his wife, son, and two dogs, or fixing the drip irrigation at his home in Washoe Valley, Nevada.