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Pollinator Conservation Program

Pollinator Conservation - Xerces Society
(Photo: Xerces Society / Jennifer Hopwood)

Pollinators are essential to our environment. The ecological service they provide is necessary for the reproduction of over 85% of the world’s flowering plants, including more than two-thirds of the world’s crop species. The United States alone grows more than 100 crops that either need or benefit from pollinators, and the economic value of these native pollinators is estimated at $3 billion per year in the U.S. Beyond agriculture, pollinators are keystone species in most terrestrial ecosystems. Fruits and seeds derived from insect pollination are a major part of the diet of approximately 25% of all birds, and of mammals ranging from red-backed voles to grizzly bears.

Unfortunately, in many places, the essential service of pollination is at risk from habitat loss, pesticide use, and introduced diseases. Follow the links below to learn more about these vital insects, the Xerces Society's pollinator conservation work, and how you can help.

 

Commit to Protecting Pollinators

Make your passion for pollinators a concrete commitment: Sign our Pollinator Protection Pledge, develop habitat on your land using region-specific information from our Pollinator Conservation Resource Center, or pursue a certification.

Conserving Pollinators in Your Landscape

The Xerces Society works across a broad array of landscapes to conserve pollinators, and can offer information to support your efforts.

Additional Resources for...

Pollinator Conservation on the Blog

The latest news from the Xerces Society's pollinator conservation team—including updates from the field; policy work; information on our certification programs, Bee City USA and Bee Better Certified; and more!

When we launched Bee Better Certified in 2017, our sights were set high on a large long-term goal: to move the agricultural industry towards being a safer landscape for bees and other pollinators. Large-scale change happens little by little over an extended period of time, and with each year that passes we continue to see increased interest and adoption of the program throughout the food industry.

Xerces is a science-based conservation organization and our work on monarchs is no different. Whether it is restoring overwintering sites in California, creating breeding habitat in New York State, or protecting monarchs from pesticides, science informs our actions and maximizes our conservation return.

Late spring and early summer are synonymous with fireflies. Females perch on vegetation or sit on the ground while males take flight, flashing their abdomens and awaiting a response from below. For humans, it could just as well be a magic show, a glimmering peek at one of the great wonders of the natural world.