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Press & Media

The Xerces team includes nationally recognized experts on a range of issues, including pollinator conservation, pesticide impacts, habitat creation, and protecting endangered species. We work to understand and protect insects and other invertebrates in all landscapes, from wildlands to backyards.

Our staff is known as a reliable source of science-based advice at the forefront of invertebrate protection, and can provide information and perspective on all aspects of invertebrate conservation. In each of the last three years, Xerces Society staff were quoted or our work was mentioned in thousands of media articles that reached over one billion people worldwide.

For general information about our work, please see our blog, publications, and other information on our website. Follow us on social media for the latest updates, as well.

We’re happy to give media interviews. Please direct all inquiries to Matthew Shepherd, Director of Communications & Outreach: (503) 807-1577, [email protected].


Recent Press Releases

March, 10 2015
A newly completed assessment has found that monarch butterflies in North America are vulnerable to extinction. The assessment was undertaken by NatureServe and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, and results were published in a report released by the U.S. Forest Service yesterday.
January, 27 2015
The annual overwintering count of monarch butterflies released today shows a modest population rebound from last year’s lowest-ever count of 34 million butterflies, but is still the second lowest population count since surveys began in 1993. The population was expected to be up this winter due to favorable spring and summer weather conditions in the monarch’s U.S. and Canadian breeding areas, as butterfly populations fluctuate widely with changing weather. But the 56.5 million monarchs currently gathered in Mexico for the winter still represents a population decline of 82 percent from the 20-year average — and a decline of 95 percent from the population highs in the mid-1990s. This year’s population was expected to be much larger due to nearly perfect climate conditions during the breeding season.
December, 29 2014
In response to a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety, Xerces Society and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said today that Endangered Species Act protection may be warranted for monarch butterflies. The agency will now conduct a one-year status review on monarchs, which have declined by 90 percent in the past 20 years.
November, 18 2014
On Wednesday, a special Task Force on Pollinator Health delivered a series of recommendations to the Oregon legislature on how to help the state’s honey bees, native bees and other pollinators. The task force’s recommendations have the potential to make improvements for pollinators, but fall short of meaningful policy solutions to address the clear threat that neonicotinoid insecticides pose to pollinators.
August, 26 2014
The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety as co-lead petitioners joined by the Xerces Society and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower filed a legal petition today to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for monarch butterflies, which have declined by more than 90 percent in under 20 years. During the same period it is estimated that these once-common iconic orange and black butterflies may have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat — an area about the size of Texas — including nearly a third of their summer breeding grounds.