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butterflies

Western Monarchs: Notes from the Field

Staff from the Xerces Society and our partners have been keeping close eyes on the imperiled western monarch population at study sites in California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho as part of a multi-year collaborative research project.

Fun with Harvester Butterflies, Part Two

Recently, photographer and Xerces Society member Bryan E. Reynolds earned a long-sought set of photos of the elusive harvester butterfly, North America’s only carnivorous butterfly.

Announcing the 2019 DeWind Awardees

The Xerces Society is happy to announce the 2019 DeWind awardees: Niranjana Krishnan, a PhD candidate at Iowa State University, and Molly Wiebush, a master’s student at Florida State University.

Community Scientists Can Help Support Imperiled Western Monarchs

While hiking in California and the rest of the West, you can help researchers by submitting any and all monarch and milkweed observations this year to the Western Monarch Milkweed Mapper website.

Photo Essay: Trinational Monarch Meeting and Exploring Mexico’s Monarch Overwintering Sites

Xerces Society Endangered Species Conservation Biologist and Western Monarch Lead Emma Pelton recounts her recent experience in Mexico with this photo essay.

National Butterfly Center Gets Reprieve—But Border Wall Will Impact Much More

There are many reasons to oppose the wall along the southern border—including the loss of habitat for some of our smallest and most important animals.

New Year’s Count of Western Monarchs Confirms Decline, Trends Seen in Previous Years

Overall, the count data revealed an average decrease of 38% between the Thanksgiving and New Year’s counts.

A Shifting Climate Creates Winners and Losers

We are already observing impacts on some species that are emerging earlier or whose distributions are changing, but it is difficult to characterize how insects as a whole will be impacted: some species will benefit while most will lose out.

The Striking Beauty of Oklahoma’s Butterflies

Oklahoma’s impressive butterfly fauna of more than 170 species includes the nation’s largest and the smallest, and representatives of all six major butterfly families.

Ups and Downs of English Chalk Grasslands

About a third of Britain’s sixty resident butterfly species may be encountered on chalk grasslands, but it is a handful of blues—common, chalkhill, small, and Adonis—that may be most characteristic of this habitat.

My First Hybrid: Limenitis archippus archippus × Limenitis arthemis astyanax

Photographer Bryan E. Reynolds encountered a rare hybrid of two of his favorite butterfly species—a well-deserved sighting for a passionate lepidopterist!

Can Robobees Solve the Pollination Crisis?

Focusing solely on crop pollination and failing to take the pollination of native plants into account may well lead to a deterioration in the plant communities that make up the very fabric of our environment.

The Endangered Species Act needs your help!

The Endangered Species Act is our nation’s most effective law for protecting animals and plants in danger of extinction, and it has prevented 99% of listed species from going extinct. We need your voice to help defend this crucial law.

Unblinded by Science

As the anniversary of the March for Science approaches, we reflect on ways science has informed our conservation efforts over the past year.

Fun with Harvester Butterflies

Have you heard of the "very hungry caterpillar" that eats aphids?

Don’t Downsize the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is unique among the BLM’s National Conservation Lands in that it is one of the most biologically diverse places in North America.

The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina’s Newest Butterfly Species

Last week, a butterfly found along the North Carolina coast was officially named as a new species.