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DeWind Alumnae Publish Three New Research Papers about Monarch Butterflies

Together, these publications contribute to our growing understanding of how human actions can hurt—or help—monarchs.

Joan Mosenthal DeWind was an early member of the Xerces Society and a keen supporter of getting young people involved in invertebrate conservation. In her memory, her husband Bill DeWind established a student research endowment fund, which is administered by the Xerces Society.

Western Monarchs: Notes from the Field

Staff from the Xerces Society and our partners have been keeping close eyes on the imperiled western monarch population at study sites in California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho as part of a multi-year collaborative research project.

To Protect Pollinators We Must Address All Risk Factors

Recent media coverage of a study on Tilia trees could lead to a dangerous misinterpretation of existing science—incorrectly exonerating neonicotinoid insecticides, which are known to harm pollinators.

The Source of Hope and Wonder Comes in Small Packages

Rich Hatfield, senior endangered species conservation biologist and bumble bee lead for the Xerces Society, trekked into Washington state’s Pasayten Wilderness to find the elusive high country bumble bee (Bombus kirbiellus).

Climate News Round-Up: The Power of Trees!

Carbon sequestration is a key component to mitigating the climate crisis. Trees are efficient, effective, and they can be deployed on a large scale. So plant a native tree today!

New Xerces Fact Sheet Takes a Deeper Look at Fungicides and Their Effects on Pollinators

Introducing Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides: Fungicide Impacts on Pollinators.

Community Science Powers New Western Monarch Studies

Western monarch researchers and community scientists have been busy, contributing information vital to understanding the situation facing this imperiled population.

5 Ways Wildlife Preservation Canada’s Bumble Bee Recovery & Conservation Initiatives Benefit from Bumble Bee Watch

Wildlife Preservation Canada’s efforts to conserve native bumble bees would be nothing without help from our volunteer community scientists across the country, and without Bumble Bee Watch.

Honoring Robbin Thorp, a Legendary Figure in North American Bee Conservation

Robbin Thorp, Professor Emeritus at University of California–Davis, has made lasting contributions to the bee conservation community in ways that might never be measured, but will certainly be felt.

Announcing the 2019 DeWind Awardees

The Xerces Society is happy to announce the 2019 DeWind awardees: Niranjana Krishnan, a PhD candidate at Iowa State University, and Molly Wiebush, a master’s student at Florida State University.

A Quest for Bumble Bee Nests: The Missing Link

Researchers at York University are recruiting members from across North America for a very important mission. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it: find and submit sightings of bumble bee nests.

Photo Essay: Trinational Monarch Meeting and Exploring Mexico’s Monarch Overwintering Sites

Xerces Society Endangered Species Conservation Biologist and Western Monarch Lead Emma Pelton recounts her recent experience in Mexico with this photo essay.

New Year’s Count of Western Monarchs Confirms Decline, Trends Seen in Previous Years

Overall, the count data revealed an average decrease of 38% between the Thanksgiving and New Year’s counts.

Record Low Number of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies in California—They Need Your Help!

We urge you to join us and our colleagues in the western monarch science and conservation community in taking meaningful, swift action to help save western monarchs.

Climate News Round-Up: January 2019

Climate change is an unprecedented global challenge. Angela Laws, our resident climate change expert, reviews recent news on the topic and provides concrete ways to help.

Are Freshwater Mussels in Hot Water?

Freshwater mussels play an important role in maintaining water quality in creeks. Climate change is altering water conditions, impacting the mussels and the fish on which they rely for part of their life cycle.

Early Thanksgiving Counts Show a Critically Low Monarch Population in California

The California overwintering population has been reduced to less than 0.5% of its historical size, and has declined by 86% compared to 2017.

Keeping the Lights Burning: The Status of Fireflies in the United States and Canada

Fireflies are well loved, but they may be in trouble. Xerces will continue to seek a better understanding of these enchanting animals and how best to protect them.

Celebrating the Legacy of Rachel Carson

Reflecting upon the impactful work of a woman writer, scientist, and environmental advocate on the anniversary of the publication of Silent Spring.

Lincoln Brower: A Life Well Spent

Remembering a ground-breaking monarch researcher, a passionate advocate for monarchs, and a beloved member of the conservation community.

Unblinded by Science

As the anniversary of the March for Science approaches, we reflect on ways science has informed our conservation efforts over the past year.

Scientists Urge Action to Protect Waters from Neonicotinoid Insecticides

Will California’s regulators take steps to curtail neonicotinoid water pollution? If they take the advice of scientists, they will.

New Fact Sheet Highlights Risks to California’s Surface Water from Insecticides

Neonicotinoids have been found in California’s rivers and streams at levels known to harm or outright kill aquatic invertebrates.

Science: Something Worth Marching For

Science underpins all that we do. That's why we're proud to be partners in the 2017 March for Science.

New Report: How Neonicotinoids Can Kill Bees

To bring clarity to the debate and to inform discussion, the Xerces Society has published How Neonicotinoids Can Kill Bees. Summarizing hundreds of studies, the new report provides an in-depth look at the science behind the role these insecticides play in harming bees.

Monarch Butterflies in the Western United States

Much of the focus on monarch butterflies is on the eastern population. Monarchs in western North America are in greater decline and need conservation help.

Climate Change Driving, Not the Only Passenger; Bumble Bee Conservation in Context

Interpreting recent research about the impacts of climate change on bumble bees, providing context for the results, and examining how they may affect conservation efforts.