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Nature Close to Home: Reimagining Gardens to Support Invertebrates

Scott Hoffman Black, executive director of the Xerces Society, encourages gardeners to increase the diversity of native plants, ensure that there are places for insects to nest, and avoid using pesticides.

Remember the Ground Nesting Bees when You Make Your Patch of Land Pollinator-Friendly

Providing nesting sites and reducing or eliminating pesticide use is key to supporting these important pollinators.

Managing Invertebrate-Friendly Gardens

Many Xerces Society members create wildlife gardens that are particularly hospitable to invertebrates. Here are three wonderful examples.

Bring Back the Pollinators During National Pollinator Week

With Pollinator Week upon us, now is the time to reaffirm our commitment to protecting these vital invertebrates. Here are some tangible ways to help.

Pesticide-Free Gardening Tips for Earth Week and Beyond

Please consider spending Earth Week in the garden, enjoying the diversity of insects, and taking a few of the actions outlined below to simultaneously minimize pest problems and avoid the use of pesticides.

Pledge to Bring Back the Pollinators—on Earth Day and Every Day

During Earth Week 2019, we are asking you to consider taking simple, yet impactful, steps to make the world better for bees, butterflies, and other essential invertebrates.

Cedaroak Park Primary School Gardens Offer Learning Opportunities

Jenni Denekas, Xerces' web and communications coordinator, writes, "Being assigned to create an interpretive panel for Cedaroak Park Primary School, where I attended grade school, was a special experience."

Weird and Wonderful Plants for Pollinators: Pale Indian Plantain

Pale Indian plantain is a plant with high ambitions—leaping to up to nine feet in height! The unusual flowers are visited by a mix of predatory wasps, which are the plant's primary pollinators and provide some of the best pest control you could ask for.

Weird and Wonderful Plants for Pollinators: Wild Quinine

Also known as wild feverfew, this plant has a long history of medicinal use by Native Americans and the US Army. During World War I, wild quinine was used as a substitute for the bark of the Cinchona tree—as the active ingredient of quinine used to treat malaria.

Weird and Wonderful Plants for Pollinators: Rattlesnake Master

It won't protect you from a snake bite, but rattlesnake master still has many virtues to recommend it.

Weird and Wonderful Plants for Pollinators: Prairie Smoke

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire - but where there’s prairie smoke, there are bumble bees, buzz-pollination, and a bit of thievery.

Bee Friendlier with Your Lawncare

If you’re ready to re-think your lawn, read on for practical advice and small changes that can help support pollinators and a healthier planet.

10 Ways to Celebrate Earth Day

Here are some ways you can work to promote a healthy planet for invertebrates and the people they let share their planet.

How Our Gardening Choices Affect the Health of Our Waterways

Pesticide Program Director Aimee Code shares thoughts on her garden, information about pesticide impacts to our watershed, and news about upcoming Xerces projects in this article from Wings Magazine.

Staff Stories: Life in the Suburbs

Our Communications Director Matthew Shepherd shares stories of creating a mini wildlife sanctuary in his Portland, OR garden, and the many plant/insect interactions that have brought his family so much enjoyment in a suburban space.

Picking Plants for Pollinators: The Cultivar Conundrum

What are cultivars, and do they have the same benefits to pollinators as non-cultivars? The answer depends—not all cultivars are created equally.

Leave the Leaves!

One of the most valuable things you can do to support pollinators and other invertebrates is to provide them with the winter cover they need in the form of fall leaves and standing dead plant material. Frequently however, this is the hardest pill for gardeners to swallow.

Are you up for the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge?

Can the nation establish a network of one million pollinator gardens within two years? Yes we can!

Don’t spring into garden cleanup too soon!

Early garden cleanup could be removing critical habitat and leaving pollinators out in the cold.

Conservation Comes Home

What you can do to defend invertebrates in your backyard and beyond.

A Mother-and-Son Perspective on a Pollinator Garden

Alice Vaughan wrote a lovely narrative of her bee garden on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Alice’s son, Mace (who co-directs our pollinator program), added his memories of sharing in the garden.

Wildflowers, Harbingers of Spring

Spring wildflowers are an important first food of the season for pollinators. Jennifer Hopwood discusses the importance of these harbingers of spring.