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eastern monarchs

Working to Conserve Monarchs from Coast to Coast

The Xerces Society is working across the U.S. to conserve this beloved species, and there are a number of ways you can help!

How to Support Monarch Butterfly Conservation—During Earth Week and Beyond!

Helping the monarch back to full health isn’t going to be easy or quick, but together we can transform the landscape to allow the monarch to rebound—and give our children the gift of watching orange wings flap in the sunshine.

Keep Monarchs Wild: Why Captive Rearing Isn’t the Way to Help Monarchs

Instead of rearing—which is risky and unproven in helping monarchs—we should focus on more effective, science-backed ways to conserve these glorious wild animals.

Tropical Milkweed—a No-Grow

Milkweed is in demand, and that demand has been filled in recent years by tropical milkweed, a non-native species. But is planting tropical milkweed potentially doing more harm than good?

1.3 Billion Stems of Milkweed Needed in Midwest to Recover Monarch Population

A new study from the USGS, Univ. of Arizona, and partner organizations finds 1.3 additional milkweed stems are needed in the Midwestern U.S. to recover monarch butterfly populations.

Western Monarch Conservation: A 40 Year History

For 40 years, the monarch migration phenomena has been recognized as a conservation priority.

To Save Monarchs, We Need More than Just Milkweed

Adult monarchs need nectar to fuel them during spring migration and breeding and to build up stores of fat which sustain them during fall migration and winter.