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neonicotinoids

To Protect Pollinators We Must Address All Risk Factors

Recent media coverage of a study on Tilia trees could lead to a dangerous misinterpretation of existing science—incorrectly exonerating neonicotinoid insecticides, which are known to harm pollinators.

New Year’s Count of Western Monarchs Confirms Decline, Trends Seen in Previous Years

Overall, the count data revealed an average decrease of 38% between the Thanksgiving and New Year’s counts.

Pesticide Program Update: Bee City USA, Treated Seeds, and Protecting Washington’s Waters

The Pesticide Program’s efforts are varied, diverse, and many, so it is difficult to summarize their work in one post! Nevertheless, here are summer and fall highlights.

Bumble Bee Die-Off Under Investigation in Virginia

Bee kill incidents have marred Pollinator Week—which should be a week of celebration. Will other states learn from Oregon to prevent future incidents and protect pollinators?

Scientists Urge Action to Protect Waters from Neonicotinoid Insecticides

Will California’s regulators take steps to curtail neonicotinoid water pollution? If they take the advice of scientists, they will.

California Halts Consideration of New Uses of Neonicotinoids in the State

This week the California Department of Pesticide Regulation announced that, effective immediately, DPR will not consider applications for any new uses of a class of neonicotinoid insecticides that includes the most widely used neonicotinoids.

New Fact Sheet Highlights Risks to California’s Surface Water from Insecticides

Neonicotinoids have been found in California’s rivers and streams at levels known to harm or outright kill aquatic invertebrates.

New Report: How Neonicotinoids Can Kill Bees

To bring clarity to the debate and to inform discussion, the Xerces Society has published How Neonicotinoids Can Kill Bees. Summarizing hundreds of studies, the new report provides an in-depth look at the science behind the role these insecticides play in harming bees.

Shortfalls of EPA’s Preliminary Risk Assessment for Imidacloprid

While we are pleased that the EPA released this initial assessment, our review of the documents shows severe shortfalls in the methods and omissions in the evaluation.