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Native Bees

USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is soliciting contract bids for spraying more than 2.6 million acres of Montana grasslands to suppress native species of grasshoppers. Spraying puts at risk organic farms and a national wildlife refuge adjacent to the proposed spray areas, as well beneficial insects within the spray blocks.
Proposal by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to spray insecticide by aircraft across 30,000 acres of public lands in Oregon will impact protected Wilderness Study Areas and be near recreational and biodiversity hotspots such as Steens Mountain, the Alvord Desert and the Pueblo Mountains.
Eleven articles published in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers the most comprehensive look to date at the topic of insect decline and the ramifications of losing diversity, abundance and biomass of insects. Scott Black, Executive Director of the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, is a coauthor on "Eight Simple Actions that Individuals can Take to Save Insects from Global Declines."
As the Environmental Protection Agency prepares to determine whether to renew dicamba product registrations for the 2021 growing season, a new report details how the herbicides pose serious threats to wild plants and the wildlife that depend upon them. The report from the National Wildlife Federation, Prairie Rivers Network and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Drifting Toward Disaster: How Dicamba Herbicides are Harming Cultivated and Wild Landscapes, reviews the state of the science on the potential far-reaching impacts of dicamba use.
A project to better understand the status of Missouri’s bumble bees is being launched this month thanks to a new conservation partnership. The Missouri Bumble Bee Atlas will combine the efforts of the Missouri Department of Conservation; the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources; two nonprofit organizations, Quail and Pheasants Forever and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; and volunteers spread throughout the state.